PRESS

Alexandria was recently interviewed for Granduer Magazine's April Issue as part of their Grand Faces of SWFL Feature- You can read more about her in the article by scrolling through the below website link.                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Granduer Magazine- part of News-Press Newspaper- April 2018

/https://www.news-press.com/story/life/style/grandeur/2018/04/08/miracle-worker-alex-vazquez-runs-costume-shop-florida-repertory-theatre/466296002/

 

 

"Florida Repertory Theatre’s current production of “The Miracle Worker” is compelling, moving and, surprisingly, even humorous...Alexandria Vazquez’s costumes help set the time in the late 19th century....And director Maureen Heffernan has guided this play well, avoiding sentimentality and predictability, though this story is so well known. She has a gift for giving us people, not stock characters, and for delving into the heart of a play. And it certainly shows here."

-Fort Myers Florida Weekly Review of The Miracle Worker- February 2018

https://fortmyers.floridaweekly.com/articles/miraculous-moving-humorous-the-miracle-worker/

 

 

"Ms. Damato deserves a jumbo box of Milk-Bones for her energetic performance. She delivers an uncanny impersonation of a dog: the look of pure devotion she bestows on Greg, the way her front paws twitch when she’s sleeping, how she turns around and around before lying down....The outfits costume designer Alexandria Vazquez gives her also help. Ms. Damato’s pigtails look just like floppy ears. And when we first meet her, she’s in a tan denim vest that’s mostly brown fur, with patches of fur on her back pants pockets, wrists and ankles....David Breitbarth plays a trio of roles. The first is Tom, a macho man Greg meets at the dog park. Tom reads a lot of books and philosophizes a lot. He so relates to his own dog that he refuses to have the pooch neutered. But it’s his two other characters that threaten to steal the show. His Phyllis is a family friend — a woman of a certain age from the East Side dressed in a Chanel suit with a double strand of pearls at her throat. And he also plays Leslie, a therapist of indeterminate gender — or, as Leslie puts it, “I let my patients select my gender.” (Ms. Vazquez again works her magic here, putting Mr. Breitbarth in a flowing New Age-style tunic.)

 -Florida Weekly Review of Sylvia-November 2017 

https://fortmyers.floridaweekly.com/articles/falling-in-love-with-sylvia-at-florida-rep/

 

 

 

"Alexandria Vazquez’s costumes are simple but creative. I especially liked her moles, dressed in trench coats, sunglasses and fur hats, like Russian spies. And who knew that amphibians wore argyle socks?...“A Year With Frog and Toad” is every bit as lovely and endearing as the books on which it’s based. From lyrics to music to costumes to props, it’s clever and unexpected. And this quintet of actors make these well-known characters step off the pages and become three-dimensional."

- Charlotte Florida Weekly Review of A Year with Frog and Toad- April 2016

https://charlottecounty.floridaweekly.com/articles/loveable-amphibians-rule-at-florida-rep/

 

 

 

"Alexandria Vazquez's costume design also pays homage to the marriage of words and woods. Each of the three actors' costumes feature rows of handwritten cursive, making their clothes appear almost as if they are made of parchment, which harkens to Irving's writing. Because the words are also woven throughout the set, the story, the characters and the forest itself are different moving parts of the same cohesive tale....At its heart, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow's appeal is the escalating suspense that reaches a crescendo during an encounter with the headless horseman, the scariest moment of the play, but there is more to its success than the obvious. It is a uniquely American tale in the way that A Christmas Carol is a uniquely British story belonging to a specific time. The early American social context — the costumes, the customs — make Irving's tale a foundation of the American identity and Snipes' direction is a faithful portrayal of that, which might be appealing to parents who want their children to get a little more than a good-natured fright."

-LexGo Review of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow- October 2013

http://www.kentucky.com/entertainment/performing-arts/article44450160.html#storylink=cpy